Question of the week!

This topic contains 40 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Maria Carolina Duran Rojas Maria Carolina Duran Rojas 1 year, 8 months ago.

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  • #7620
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    How many different ways is “ough” pronounced in this sentence – “It was tough to cough as I ploughed through the dough”?

    a. Four
    b. Five
    c. Three
    d. Two

    • #7717

      d. two

  • #7567
    Profile photo of Tat Ruck
    Tat Ruck
    Participant

    Question of the week – for English language learners.

  • #6598
    Profile photo of Gülcan Kılıç
    Gülcan Kılıç
    Participant

    c) his own opinions.

  • #6546
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    What does a philodox treasure over just about anything else?

    a. His money
    b. Her array of boyfriends
    c. His own opinions
    d. Her garden

  • #6234

    THe letter X?

  • #6175
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    What letter gets the fewest words in most dictionaries?

    a. Z
    b. Q
    c. X
    d. Y

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
  • #6207
    Profile photo of Gülcan Kılıç
    Gülcan Kılıç
    Participant

    Among these options I think Pronoun. Maybe I am thinking with my native language but İf there was an adjective option I would say that. Because Adjectives describe nouns and for example when we say ‘which one’, or ‘which person’ dont they describe nouns?

    thank you!

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by Profile photo of Gülcan Kılıç Gülcan Kılıç.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
  • #6054
    Profile photo of John Earle
    John Earle
    Participant

    Hi Paul. Not sure how many people would call this ‘easy stuff’.

    Thinking back to my school days, I seem to remember such words being called relative pronouns?

    John

  • #5952
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Nouns, verbs … easy stuff. But which kind of word is “which”?

    a. Pronoun
    b. Article
    c. Adverb
    d. Conjunction

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
  • #5907
    Profile photo of John Earle
    John Earle
    Participant

    Yes, of course, what you say is correct. I was being light-hearted and attempting to be amusing. Clearly I failed! :-)

  • #5906

    I think that if you use like criterion the semantic field, “unmemorable” is the odd one cut between that set of words

  • #5902
    Profile photo of John Earle
    John Earle
    Participant

    What criterion are you using for making the choice?

    You could argue that ‘scatty’ is the odd one out on the grounds that it is the only one with fewer than 8 letters! :-)

  • #5815

    unmemorable is the odd one out

  • #5741
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Which is the odd one out?

    a) forgetful
    b) unmemorable
    c) absent-minded
    d) scatty

  • #5740
    Profile photo of John Earle
    John Earle
    Participant

    Yes, a shiver is the collective noun that I came across.

    Many, if not most, of the collective nouns are rarely heard in everyday speech so one wonders how they arose and who decided that they are the ‘correct’ term. It seems fairly obvious that a word for a group or collection of similar or identical objects is useful. However, some of them are very obscure and therefore unlikely to be widely known. That must reduce their utility.

  • #5737
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Is it a ‘shiver’ or a ‘what’? Try this link for a list of weird and wonderful collective nouns.

    http://www.rinkworks.com/words/collective.shtml

  • #5722
    Profile photo of John Earle
    John Earle
    Participant

    One I remember from school (a very long time ago) and which I hear very rarely is ‘a pod of dolphins’.

    A short time ago, I came across a collective noun for sharks which I had not heard before. What would you insert here for ‘a ….. of sharks’?

  • #5572
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    A clowder of cats is what they say….amazingly. Collective nouns for species……aaagh…….but fascinating!

  • #5481
    Profile photo of Tat Ruck
    Tat Ruck
    Participant

    Wow @sunsi – is that right? I never knew that! My favourites are the bird ones: a parliament of owls and a mumrmuration of starlings. Check these out: collective nouns for birds

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
  • #5465

    A clowder of cats

  • #5273
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Complete the following:

    A pride of lions
    A pack of dogs
    A………………of cats?

  • #6243
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Which letter gets the fewest words in most dictionaries?

    a. Z
    b. Q
    c. X
    d. Y

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Tat Ruck Tat Ruck.
  • #1257
    Profile photo of Kasia  B. Turajczyk
    Kasia B. Turajczyk
    Participant

    unpredictable

    pleasantly not-hot

    whimsical  :-)

  • #526
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Which 3 adjectives would you use to describe summer weather in the UK?

  • #532
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Summer’s here!  Where did you spend your most memorable holiday?

  • #1269
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Great music……..food……… atmosphere……..& meeting lots of new people.

  • #1270
    Profile photo of FRANCESCO PISTILLO
    FRANCESCO PISTILLO
    Participant

    The community. Sharing dreams, ideas, projects with people I have known in the last two years. Feeling at home or at a friends’ house.

  • #1271
    Profile photo of Rita Szaniszló
    Rita Szaniszló
    Participant

    The thai food, the drum workshop, the sun, the crazy looking people enjoying the music.

  • #546
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    For all the Respect festival goers………What was your festival highlight?

  • #1277
    Profile photo of Kasia  B. Turajczyk
    Kasia B. Turajczyk
    Participant

    According to the Oxford English Dictionary the longest word in English language is: Pneumono­ultra­microscopic­silico­volcano­coniosis. It is a lung disease. I was trying to pronounce it….not easy :-)

  • #556
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    What is the longest word in the English language?

  • #1283
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    At the moment it’s around 86%, but as you say it will probably decrease as internet access grows in countries like China.

  • #1284
    Profile photo of Kasia  B. Turajczyk
    Kasia B. Turajczyk
    Participant

     I guess it will 55% not more than that. Probably in a few year Chinese Mandarin will take over the English. 

  • #572
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    What percentage of the internet is in English?

    a) 55%     b) 69%    c) 86%    d) 92%    e) 95%

  • #1287
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Thanks Kasia.

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  • #1288
    Profile photo of Kasia  B. Turajczyk
    Kasia B. Turajczyk
    Participant

    Great Britain is the island: England, Scotland and Wales. UK is the unit of Great Britain + Northern Ireland. 

  • #579
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    What’s the difference between the United Kingdom and Great Britain?

  • #1289
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    Hi Daniel,

    Casserole is borrowed from French, but did the French borrow it from somewhere else? Although shampoo and coffee sound French they’re borrowed from other languages. Try a google search for their origins.

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  • #1290
    Profile photo of Daniel Stefanski
    Daniel Stefanski
    Participant

    Hello!

    Casserole is borrowed from French. Shampoo and coffee they both sounds French to me. No idea about the rest though . 

  • #585
    Profile photo of Paul Vass
    Paul Vass
    Keymaster

    The following English words come from other languages.  Can you guess which languages they are borrowed from?

    1. tea

    2. coffee

    3. casserole

    4. potato

    5. shampoo

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